Author Archives: ozzdogg

QCAN to Screen Film on Climate Change and U.S. Military

March 2, 2018

On Tuesday, March 27, Quincy Climate Action Network will cosponsor The Age of Consequences, a 2017 documentary film on the threat of climate change as seen by the US military (see the trailer here). The film will screen at 7 p.m. at the Thomas Crane Public Library, 40 Washington Street, Quincy. All are invited, and admission is free. Also sponsoring the film are the library and Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station.

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Food Waste Composting: A Letter to the Quincy Sun

December 12, 2017

Dear Editor,

The Quincy DPW recently won a grant from the state that allows it to sell backyard composters for $25, half the previous, already discounted price. Whether you garden or just care about the health of our planet, I’d urge you to visit the DPW at 55 Sea Street weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and get yourself one of these great devices—or buy one as a gift. Continue reading

Tale of Two State Reps: A Letter to the Quincy Sun

November 30, 2017

Dear Editor,

Last month, citizen activists from Quincy Climate Action Network met separately with two Quincy state representatives to request their support for pending legislation that will affect public health, electricity costs, and greenhouse gas emissions in our city and state for years to come.  The responses we got from the legislators, Rep. Bruce Ayers and Rep. Tackey Chan, could not have been more different.
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Candidates’ Night 2017

October 19, 2017

See where candidates for Quincy city council stand on environmental issues

The Quincy Climate Action Network hosted a candidates’ night for open city council seats on October 19, 2017. All 12 candidates – six vying for three at-large positions and two contenders each for wards 1, 5 and 6 – attended. They answered QCAN members’ environmental questions, most of which had been sent to them ahead of time. Continue reading

Quincy’s LED Streetlights


As of today, Quincy has converted more than half of its streetlights to LEDs. Upon completion the project will reduce city government’s electricity usage by 10% and make a big dent in our greenhouse gas emissions. You can follow the progress of LED conversion at the web site below. Areas in blue have already been converted, areas in yellow are scheduled for conversion, and lights in areas in pink–eg, Quincy Shore Drive–are not owned by the city: