Category Archives: News & Events

Quincy’s Fabulous Trees: a panel discussion on Jan. 21, 2021

1/11/21

Do you have a favorite neighborhood tree? Want to learn how to protect it, care for your own trees, and see if you qualify for a free tree from the state? Tree experts will discuss all of these issues and more in a panel discussion on January 21 at 7 pm. The Thomas Crane Library, a co-sponsor of the event, will host the discussion on Zoom, YouTube and Facebook (details below). Continue reading

All-electric buses on the horizon

2020 wasn’t all bad. After months of lobbying by QCAN and others, the MBTA announced that a few dozen climate-friendly battery electric buses will be used at a new bus depot planned for southwest Quincy.

Quincy’s current bus depot, built on Hancock Street in 1904, is too small to fit buses manufactured after 2010, making Quincy’s diesel-only buses the oldest – and the dirtiest – in the state. These buses spew out pollution that harms people’s health and greenhouse gases that heat the planet. (Transportation is in fact the biggest single source of greenhouse gas emissions in the US.)

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Greener electricity for Quincy

On December 7, the Quincy City Council unanimously approved a plan that will increase the proportion of our electricity that comes from renewable sources. The plan, called Quincy Community Electricity (QCE), enables the city to engage a new default supplier of electricity for residents and small businesses, using our pooled buying power to secure bulk pricing that will be more stable, and possibly lower, than current rates. While Massachusetts currently requires 16% of electricity to come from renewable sources such as hydropower, wind, or solar, Quincy will seek a supplier that generates a higher proportion from renewables. The default offering will be 10% additional renewably sourced electricity; residents will also be able to opt up to 50 or 100%, or opt down to the state-mandated amount.

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Historic treasures should be preserved

Imagine a machine first built in John Adams’s time that has chugged along without a hiccup for 200 years. It would undoubtedly be treated with kid gloves, and every effort would be made to preserve and protect it. Perhaps the Quincy History Museum would display it so that people could stand in awe of the engineering marvel and feel a visceral connection to the past in the rhythmic shifting of its components.

Well, such a machine actually exists – right here in our fair city. Not only that, but this machine has been proven to make people happier, healthier, and wealthier, to prevent flooding, and to fight climate change. What is this astonishing contraption? It’s hiding in plain sight, an unsung hero that makes a city street feel like part of a neighborhood: a mature tree. Continue reading

QCAN Meets with Senator Keenan

Several QCAN members met with Massachusetts Senator John Keenan (Norfolk and Plymouth District) during his office hours on December 7 to discuss some of our organization’s priorities and learn about how we might help him advance climate-friendly legislation.

Board member Joe Murphy described our work to convince the Quincy City Council to transition away from single-use plastic bags; to raise public awareness about climate change through co-hosting an environmental fairlectures, and film nights at the library; to present on climate change to every sixth-grade classroom in Quincy public schools; and to work with Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station to fight the construction of the fracked-gas compressor station in North Weymouth.

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The MBTA Needs to Switch to Electric Buses

10/16/20

At its October 5 meeting, our City Council urged the MBTA to switch to zero-emissions electric buses on all bus routes in Quincy, a change that would happen in 2024, on completion of the planned South Quincy bus barn. In a resolution cosponsored by Councilors Brian Palmucci, Noel DiBona, Nina Liang, and Anne Mahoney, the councilors point out that electric buses have one quarter the carbon footprint of the diesel hybrid buses the T is planning to bring to Quincy, a footprint that promises to diminish and eventually disappear as the electricity supply comes more and more from renewable sources. So switching to electric buses would be another step towards protecting us from the worst effects of climate change—things like the flooding and droughts, hurricanes and wildfires we’ve been seeing here in Quincy and around the world.

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